Furniture Makeovers Home decor

Product Review: Chalk Paint Made with Poppie’s Paint Powder

Poppie's Paint Powder Review | www.thechelseaproject.com
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Shortly after my epic fail attempt at using home-made chalk paint hit the internet, I got a call from a nice lady who asked if I’d like to try home-made chalk paint again.  And, honestly, I wanted to stop her right between the words chalk and paint with a big ole’ Southern-style “Thankee, Ma’am, but no thankee.”

Disclosure: I received free paint from Poppies Paint Powder in exchange for writing a review on the blog. This post does NOT contain an affiliate link and all opinions are 100% my own.

But, I didn’t……..and she went on to say that she believed she had a product that would forever take the place of my chalk paint nemesis, plaster of Paris.

“Huuuum.”  I thought.  “Get rid of plaster of Paris?  That master of disaster?”

“OK…..and Hallelujah.  Bring on the Poppie’s.”

What Is It?

Look somewhere between ready-made and home-made chalk paint, and you’ll find Poppie’s Paint Powder.  In case you haven’t heard of it, here’s a little primer.

Poppie's Paint Powder Review | TheChelseaProject.com

Poppie’s is a 100% all-natural mineral product that, when mixed with any latex or acrylic paint, turns the paint into chalk paint.  Before using, the powder is mixed with a measured amount of warm water, then added to the paint.  And, like other chalk paints, this product works so that you don’t have to strip, sand, or prime the piece.  For more details, please visit the Poppie’s Paint Powder website.

I was pleased when Poppie’s sent me a box of their product to try and then share what I learned with all of you. 

And, with that, let’s take it to the lab.

In this review, Poppie’s will be compared to the results of a home-made chalk paint and those of Americana Decor.  To create conditions that are as similar as possible, Poppie’s will be mixed with the same latex paint that changed from indigo to baby blue when it was mixed with plaster of Paris.  Remember that “homemade chalk paint gone wild” fiasco? (Click here for the link)  And then, this mixture was applied to a stool from the same furniture family as a chair that had been painted with Americana Decor.  This is as much as I can level the playing field without using raw wood and applying all three simultaneously.  But, I’d rather produce real world.

THE PREP AND THE PAINT:

IMG_2694(1)  Thoroughly wipe-down one gaudy orange-toned stool with a damp rag.  Just make sure it’s really clean and get into all of the nooks and crannies.  No other prep is necessary unless repairs to the piece are needed.  For the piece here, we are good to go.  Poppie's Paint Powder Review (2) from The Chalk Paint Diaries | TheChelseaProjectBlog.Wordpress.com

(2)  While the stool dries, mix the paint.  I only made 1/4 cup of paint so the amounts of Poppie’s and water mixed into the paint were tiny.  And with this, I still had paint left over.

(3)  Once the paint is well mixed, time to paint yourself a wild streak.  Then, let it dry and check if a second coat is necessary.  I didn’t do a second coat on the underneath parts, but did apply a second coat on the very top and the outside of the legs.  The coverage was good with one coat, but the paint was mixed and the stool will take a boatload of abuse, so a second surely won’t hurt.

THE POPPIE’S EFFECT:

After all is said and done, how did Poppie’s shake out?

Poppie's Paint Powder Review (3) from The Chalk Paint Diaries | TheChelseaProjectBlog.Wordpress.com(1) When the product was mixed with the latex paint, it did not change colors (left).  The paint did seem to thicken slightly, but this made the resultant paint more like the ready-made, not less. Poppie's Paint Powder Review (4) from The Chalk Paint Diaries | TheChelseaProjectBlog.Wordpress.com The consistency was like a yogurt (maybe a little thinner) and had almost no graininess.  It was a very smooth mix.

(2)  The paint did leave brush marks just like the ready-made used to paint the green apple chair (link to see here) and the home-made used to paint the chest (link to see here).

(3)  There was no globbing of Poppie’s or premature drying so that the product wouldn’t spread easily.  All three products did well here.

(4)  Dry time is comparable among the three.  Expect the painted item to dry within the hour depending on humidity.

(5)  All three paints covered about the same, but if I had to rank them… I believe the Poppie’s edged out the Americana Decor and the home-made by a nose.  The Poppie’s gel just seemed to grab the wood a little bit better.     Poppie's Paint Powder Review (6) from The Chalk Paint Diaries | The

(6)  As for distressing the dried paint, the rank from hardest surface to softest surface goes like this.  Home-made has the hardest surface, Poppie’s is in the middle, and Americana Decor is on the soft end.  The Americana Decor had to be distressed with very fine sandpaper and very soft hands or too much paint would come off.  Poppie’s was close to Americana Decor, but had set-up a little better.  In contrast, the home-made paint required considerably more sanding pressure in order to distress.  The color of all three paints dulled when sanded.

(7)  At least two coats of poly is needed for all three, but the color surely does pop when the poly is applied.  I did not wax any of these three pieces.

(8)  Cost depends on several variables.  Suggest to visit websites or stores for current cost per quantity of paint or additives for accurate comparisons.

Poppie's Paint Powder Review (7) from The Chalk Paint Diaries | TheChelseaProjectBlog.Wordpress.com

And, since I never could warm up to the stencil pattern on the top, I had to make a change.  It was just too big and bold for my taste.  I’m such a solids person so I repainted and resanded the top.  

Note:  When I opened the leftover paint, it was as fresh as a daisy.  For me, being able to keep the left over paint is a real perk.  

And, the Poppie’s stuck to the poly-coated top like white on rice …..and then sanded with total ease.

Poppie's Paint Powder Review (8) from The Chalk Paint Diaries | TheChelseaProjectBlog.Wordpress.com

Poppie’s can significantly cut the costs for using quality chalk paint.  But, before rendering a final opinion, I want to use the mix on a larger piece.  In fact, I already have a couple of pieces in mind.  Both of the pieces have bends and turns in the wood plus wood inlays.  I’ll chose one and give Poppie’s another workout.  This will give us a better idea of how well Poppie’s goes into delicate spaces, dries, and distresses.

Poppie's Paint Powder Review (9) from The Chalk Diaries | TheChelseaProjectBlog.Wordpress.com

It is always a joy to prepare and share information with you.  I just love researching a product and then putting it to the test.  If you have ideas that can make the posts more helpful to you, please send me an email or comment.  I’d be so pleased to make it happen.

Thanks again for stopping by….hope to see you again soon.

And, as always…please…..don’t forget to PIN……..thanks so much.

Home Made Chalk Paint | Latex paint + Poppie's Paint Powder | #sponsored | The Chelsea Project | www.thechelseaproject.com

More pieces refinished using Poppie’s:

Click here to the the nightstand post

Farmhouse nightstand makeover using chalk paint made from latex paint | #sponsored Poppies Paint Powder | www.thechelseaproject.com

Click here to see a farmhouse-style coffee table makeover

Farmhouse Coffee Table Makeover | www.thechelseaproject.com

Click here to see the bar stools turned table chairs post

From Black Bar Stools to White Table Chairs | The Chelsea Project | www.thechelseaproject.com

 Signature

Disclosure:   Two containers of Poppie’s Paint Powder were supplied.

There were no other forms of compensation. All work and opinions are my own.

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12 Comments

  • Reply Toni | smallhomesoul.com March 23, 2016 at 2:03 pm

    I have yet to try chalk paint but I appreciate your analysis of the various options. I wouldn’t want to use a product that changed the color of my paint since I usually waver a long time before actually picking a color. I’ll have to check out Poppies and give it a try.

    • Reply theChelseaProject March 23, 2016 at 2:08 pm

      The only problems I was able to document from the Internet was in the indigo family. Interesting, Isn’t it? No one has even explained why, but the only complaints I found were all indigo. Thanks for stopping by. Always Appreciate your comments.

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  • Reply Marshablog March 31, 2016 at 4:47 am

    Many thanks for sharing! I love it.:D

    • Reply theChelseaProject March 31, 2016 at 6:24 am

      Thanks so much.

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  • Reply Deborah July 9, 2016 at 5:03 pm

    So good to read your review!!!

    • Reply theChelseaProject July 11, 2016 at 1:47 pm

      Thanks Deb! So good to have you stop by! XO

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