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DIY Woven Jute Lampshade

DIY Jute Lampshade | The Chelsea Project | www.thechelseaproject.com
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I just have to be honest with you.  One of the reasons it takes me so long to get through a room refresh is because I not only do the walls and floors, but I try to reuse everything in the room.

Case in point, this sad, outdated lamp.  During the sunroom refresh, it was more than clear.  This little darling was too big, too dark, and it blocked the view.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #1 | The Chelsea Project Blog

The bottom could be fixed with paint.  But, the shade?  Huuuum, that’s a different story.  The new shade needed to be inexpensive, unique, and see-through.

Yes.  See-through.  Can you dig it?

To get the ball rolling, I found another lampshade from my stash of old, abandoned lampshades and ripped away the fabric.  Although the shape and size of the frame were good, it still needed something.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #2 | The Chelsea Project Blog

A few days later, I was shopping for upholstery fabric and ran across this loosely woven jute fabric in the burlap section of the store.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #3 | The Chelsea Project Blog

As soon as I saw it, I knew it was exactly what the doctor ordered.  I just didn’t know what the heck it was.  Turns out, it is jute soil erosion control cloth.  Yea.  It is.  Pinky promise. You know the stuff they lay across newly tilled soil so that it doesn’t blow away or become a mudslide?  Yea, that’s the stuff.  And, it ravels like crazy.  I mean, when the yardage was cut, this stuff raveled a good six inches up from the cut.

So heads up about figuring yardage and handling the fabric.  Buy more than you need and handle with care.  I bought a yard for a lampshade that is 7 inches (top ring) by 17 inches (bottom ring) by 13 inches (in length).  It was more than enough, but because of the unusual raveling, I was able to use the long strings, too.  This way, there was very little leftover product and zero waste.

Then, in order to cover the frame without additional raveling, I borrowed a tip from a first-aid playbook.  Use a tourniquet to stop the bleeding.  So, using strings that had raveled away from the yardage, I wound the strings around the fabric and the frame.  This allowed the fabric to be attached to the frame all in one piece. The goal was to stop the bleeding raveling and get the fabric attached.  That’s all.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #4 | The Chelsea Project Blog

Once the fabric is securely attached to the frame, the fabric at the top of the shade can be cut away.  The bottom will have to be cut away in small sections.  It’s sort of a wrap, cut, wrap, cut rhythm.  You can certainly go all the way around the bottom before cutting, but it’s awkward to handle.  I just cut an inch or two at a time.  Notice also, in the picture below, that the frame isn’t completely covered.  This is because a second wrap will cover the remaining frame, any knots tied to stop raveling, and the ends of the jute where the fabric was cut.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #5 | The Chelsea Project Blog

Once the fabric is secured to the frame and the excess fabric is trimmed away, pull long strings from the excess fabric and wrap the entire top circle and bottom circle of the frame.  Make a very consistent loop and pull the jute tight with every loop.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #6 | The Chelsea Project Blog

And, that’s all there is to it.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #7 | The Chelsea Project Blog

A lampshade made from a biodegradable geotextile used to prevent soil erosion.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #8 | The Chelsea Project Blog

Now, I’ve seen everything.  ðŸ™‚

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #9 | The Chelsea Project Blog

By the way, at my fabric store, the jute costs $4.95 per yard, but I later saw it at an online fabric store for less than half that price.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #10 | The Chelsea Project Blog

The bottom portion of the lamp was painted with various shades of gold, purple, and aqua chalk paint made from Oooops paint.  I have no idea what the colors actually are.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #11 | The Chelsea Project Blog

And, a low-heat LED bulb replaced a traditional bulb.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade #12| The Chelsea Project Blog

All in all, I’d say mission accomplished.  The see-though lampshade and the color wash on the bottom portion really help this area to house the much needed lamp, but without sacrificing quite so much of the view.

But, that’s just what I think.  I’d love to hear what you think about using this fabric and other fabrics, too.

DIY Woven Jute Lampshade on Pinterest

And, it’s always an honor to have you pin it for later.

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7 Comments

  • Reply DIY Woven Jute Lampshade | The Chelsea Project April 20, 2016 at 8:44 pm

    […] DIY Woven Jute Lampshade […]

  • Reply Carolann May 7, 2016 at 7:47 am

    Love this Susie! It’s so creative and original! Great job and beautiful transformation!

    • Reply theChelseaProject May 11, 2016 at 8:00 pm

      Thanks, Carolann. We love the lampshade….use it every day. 🙂

  • Reply Nancy September 9, 2016 at 9:35 am

    Haha! What an awesome project! You must be brilliant…in fact I know you are. This is so cute. I love jute lamp shades.

    Nancy

    • Reply theChelseaProject September 11, 2016 at 9:55 am

      LOL…Nancy. Thanks.. but since we did basically the same project… let’s say great minds think alike.

  • Reply Kimberly September 22, 2016 at 11:27 am

    Gardening burlap is sold by the roll at places like Lowe’s. It costs less than $10 for 8 yards. Hope this helps.

    • Reply theChelseaProject September 22, 2016 at 11:34 am

      Thanks Kimberly…

    Hello -- Welcome -- and thanks for your comments!